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Ten Top Areas for Air Sealing


- Attic Access Doors and Hatches – Usually contain no gaskets, sealing material or insulation.  

- Holes in the attic floor or crawlspace ceiling – wires, pipes, vents, calbes, etc.

- Attic knee wall – wires, pipes, electric switch and outlet boxes.

 - Soffit areas, such as above cabinets.  Usually not sealed and many times not insulated.

- Duct registers – floor or ceiling.  Many have gaps between sheetrock, floor covering, etc which provides an air path.

- Electric outlets and switches

- Windows and doors

- Recessed lights (can lights).  If not ICAT (insulation contact air tight) rated must not cover up in attic.

 - Fireplace – damper and around chimney

- All exterior penetrations –Cable, telephone, plumbing, dryer vents, etc.

For those that would like to do some of the work, below are recommendations for sealing to help stop air infiltration:

Although windows, doors, and outside walls contribute to air leakage, the biggest holes are usually hidden from view. Most homeowners are aware that air leaks into their houses through what seem to be small openings around doors and window frames and through fireplaces and chimneys. Air also enters the living space from other unheated parts of the house, such as attics, basements, or crawl spaces. These holes and pathways (sometimes called bypasses) connect the house to the attic, crawlspace, or basement. To effectively reduce infiltration, seal the big holes first, then the large cracks and penetrations, and finally the smaller cracks and seams.


Additional Information for Sealing Your Home:


A Do-It Yourself Guide to Energy Star Home Sealing

Arkansas Energy Office Guide to Home Tightening

Air sealing